Employability In Epilepsy Patients ‘Affected By Internal And External Factors’

New research from Asia has been published that helps to broaden current understanding of the positive and negative factors affecting employability in patients with uncontrolled seizures.

Carried out by the University of Malaya and published in the medical journal Epilepsy & Behavior, the study consisted of semi-structured interviews with 21 patients with uncontrolled seizures, the findings of which were then broken down using interpretative phenomenological analysis.

It was demonstrated that 52.4 per cent of the participants interviewed were employed, with seven holding full-time positions with more than four years of working experience.

A total of six main themes were identified as being particularly important in affecting employability among people with uncontrolled seizures, including the ability to work; intention to work; support and stigma at the workplace; family support, overdependence and protection; life events; and the provision of government and welfare support.

Key factors affecting patients’ ability to work included education and cognitive and physical functions, as well as their individual capability to continue working after seizures, to travel to work and to cope with stress.

Most of those surveyed expressed a view that employment is important, but their intention to work varied. The employed group tended to work for a future goal and self-satisfaction, with this group also usually benefiting from better support from their employers and families.

The researchers concluded: “There were internal and external factors affecting employability among people with uncontrolled seizures both positively and negatively. Positive internal factors such as ability and intention to work require further exploration.”

Epilepsy does not prevent people from getting into work or staying in the job they want. However, the specific nature of their condition will naturally create certain safety considerations that they will need to discuss with their employers in order to create the best working arrangement.

Posted by Bob Jones

Publication abstract: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1525505015000645

Reposted from Epilepsy News UK

0 comments

Leave a comment